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Turkey fajitas

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Colombia Is My Kitchen


Colombian cuisine is a compound of the culinary traditions of the six main regions within the country (Pacific, Amazonian, Andean, Orinoco, Caribbean, and Insular). Colombian cuisine varies regionally and is particularly influenced by Indigenous Colombian, Spanish, and African cuisines, with slight Arab influence in some regions. Furthermore, being one of the most biodiverse countries in the world, Colombia has one of the widest variety of available ingredients depending on the region.
Arepa
there is nothing more Colombian than the arepa. A circular bread made from fresh cornmeal, arepas are the foundations of many meals, and often times they’re eaten alone.
Bandeja Paisa
Colombia’s national dish, without a doubt, is the bandeja paisa. Reigning from the Antioquia region (where Medellín is located, and where natives are referred to as paisas), the bandeja paisa is a feast that is not for the faint-hearted. On one plate you’ll normally find steak, ground beef, chicharrones, rice, beans, an egg, avocado, an arepa, and plantains.
Buñuelos
Another popular street food and an unmissable staple during the holiday months of November and December, buñuelos can best be described as fried dough balls that are somehow simultaneously sweet and savory. You can find some filled with cheese, but the Colombian version is fairly plain and sprinkled with powdered sugar.
Cazuela de Mariscos
With coastlines along the Caribbean and the Pacific Ocean, you’d imagine that Colombia knows a thing or two about seafood cuisine The cazuela de mariscos is a thick, hearty soup that can include lobster, shrimp, white fish, and vegetables, all bathed in a broth of creamy coconut milk. It’s considered to be an aphrodisiac, but we’ll leave it up to you to see if the facts hold true
Leonor Espinosa, chef-owner of Leo and Misia in Bogotá and recently crowned Latin America's Best Female Chef, said: “Colombia is the country of wrapped dishes. There are over 60 different leaves used to preserve, wrap and cook different ingredients. Working and cooking with leaves is wonderful and it’s something not everyone knows about.”

Main
Empanadas  Print Recipe

The origins of the empanada are not entirely clear, but it seems most likely that they first appeared in Argentina in the kitchens of immigrants from northern Spain, where the dish’s forebear was a larger, double-crusted pie cut into slices.
Once in South America, the empanada — meaning bread-wrapped — continued to evolve from a pie made with dough to individual pockets of pastry crust, often made with animal fat in beef-loving Argentina. The hand-held pies were baked or fried after being filled with whatever was available in the region at the time.
Unbaked empanadas can be made 3 months ahead and kept frozen
Serves: 8
Preparation time:40 minutes
Cooking time:35 minutes
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divide
1 lb. ground beef (25% fat)
1 medium onion, chopped
1 small red bell peppers, seeded, chopped
Salt, freshly ground pepper
1 Tbsp. ground cumin
1 Tbsp. sweet paprika
1/2 Tbsp. dried oregano
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
3/4 cups low-sodium vegetable stock
1 tsp. sugar
½ cup raisins
1 recipe PIE CRUST (Recipe included)
½ cup pitted green olives (Picholine or Spanish), rinsed well, cut in half lengthwise, divided
Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large pot over high. Cook ground beef, breaking up with a spoon, until browned but not completely cooked through, 6–8 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl with a slotted spoon, leaving as much fat in pan as possible.
Reduce heat to medium and cook onions, chopped, red bell peppers, seeded, chopped, and remaining 1 Tbsp. oil, stirring, until tender but not browned, 6–8 minutes; season with salt and black pepper. Add ground cumin, sweet paprika, dried oregano, and cayenne pepper and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add low-sodium chicken stock or broth and reserved beef along with any accumulated juices to pot. Stir in sugar, salt, and black pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring and scraping up any brown bits, until most of the liquid is evaporated, 15–20 minutes; taste and season with salt and black pepper, if needed. Stir in raisins. Transfer to a medium bowl, cover, and chill at least 3 hours.
Preheat oven to 375°.
Roll the pie crust to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut dough into 5-inch circles. Place 2 Tbsp. filling in the center of each round.
Top with 2 olive halves. Brush water around half of outer edge of each round. Pinch edges to seal.
Using a fork, crimp edges. Transfer empanada to a parchment-lined sheet tray, spacing 1" apart. Repeat with remaining rounds.
Bake empanadas until golden brown and slightly darker around the edges, 25–35 minutes.


Pie crust:

1 pound (3 1/4 cups) all purpose flour
1/2 pound (11/2 cups) shortening
1 teaspoon light brown sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon white vinegar
1 beaten egg
4 tablespoons cold water
In a large bowl, mix together flour, and shortening.
In a small bowl, combine the sugar, salt, vinegar, egg, and water.
Blend all ingredients to form a ball. Add more water if necessary.
Chill dough and use as needed.

Main
Turkey fajitas  Print Recipe

This meal is quick and easy.Serve with salsa and light sour cream on the side.
Serves: 4
Preparation time:30 minutes
Cooking time:15 minutes
1 pound boneless turkey breast tenderloins, cut into thin strips
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 each medium green, sweet red and yellow peppers, cut into 1/4-inch strips
1 medium onion, thinly sliced and separated into rings
1 garlic clove, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 cup minced fresh cilantro
1/4 cup lime juice
8 flour tortillas (6 inches), warmed
In a large nonstick skillet, saute turkey in oil for 2 minutes.
Add the peppers, onion, garlic, salt, cumin, pepper and cayenne. Cook and stir for 5 minutes or until turkey is no longer pink and peppers are crisp-tender.
Stir in cilantro and lime juice; cook 1 minute longer. Serve in tortillas.

Dessert
Buñuelos  Print Recipe

A buñuelo is fried dough. It is a popular snack in Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, Spain, Turkey, Greece, and Morocco, and is a tradition at Christmas, Ramadan, and among Sephardic Jews at Hanukkah. Ref: Wikipedia
This recipe can be made the day before and placed in the refrigerator to rise covered overnight.
Serves: 8
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time:15 minutes
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 110 degrees F.)
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 package active dry yeast
7 tablespoons milk
2 tablespoons shortening
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
Vegetable oil for frying.
In a small bowl, stir together the warm water and the sugar. Sprinkle the yeast over this and let it set for about 10 minutes
In a small saucepan over medium-low heat, heat the milk, shortening, and salt just until the shortening melts. Remove from heat and let the mixture cool down to lukewarm
Place the flour into a large mixing bowl and begin to mix in both the yeast and the milk mixtures, stirring briskly to mix in all the ingredients. When the dough becomes to thick to mix with the spoon, turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for a minimum of 5 minutes. The dough should be smooth and elastic when pulled and not sticky. It should spring back slightly when you poke a finger into it.

Roll the dough ball in a lightly oiled large bowl. Cover the bowl loosely with a tea towel or plastic wrap. Let the dough rise in a warm place until doubled in size, approximately 1 to 2 hours.
When dough has risen, punch down the dough, cut it into four (4) equal sections, and allow it to rest for another 10 minutes.
While the dough is resting heat your oil to 375 degrees F. (a skillet or electric fryer works best).
Divide each dough quarter into three (3) pieces. Pat them into a 4-inch circle, stretching and pressing until a round shape is formed.
Carefully place the dough pieces into the hot oil and fry until they puff up and are browned, approimately 1 minute. With a slotted spoon, flip the Buñuelo over and cook for another 1 minute to brown the second side. Remove from the hot oil and drain well.
Buñuelos can be kept warm in a 200 degree F. oven for up to 1 hour. They refrigerate well and can be reheated in a 350 degree F. oven for 10 to 15 minutes before serving.
conversion of liquids
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Centiliters - cl
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Cups - c
Ounces liquids - fl oz
Tablespoons - tbsp
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Weights
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Kilogramms :  kg
Gramms :  g
Pounds :  lb
Ounces :  oz

Temperatures

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Degrees Celsius :  °C
degrees Fahrenheit :  °F

Measures of non liquid ingredients



Non-liquid ingredients in volume converted
into weight using the table below.
For products not included, use a metric scale
Weight of specific 'ingredients in grams

Ingredient

1 cup

3/4 cup

2/3 cup

1/2 cup

1/3 cup

1/4 cup

2 tablespoons

All-purpose wheat flour 120 g 90 g 80 g 60 g 40 g 30 g 15 g
All-purpose sifted wheat flour 110 g 80 g 70 g 55 g 35 g 27 g 13 g
White sugar 200 g 150 g 130 g 100 g 65 g 50 g 25 g
Powdered sugar/Icing sugar 100 g 75 g 70 g 50 g 35 g 25 g 13 g
Brown sugar normally packed 180 g 135 g 120 g 90 g 60 g 45 g 23 g
Corn flour 160 g 120 g 100 g 80 g 50 g 40 g 20 g
Cornstarch 120 g 90 g 80 g 60 g 40 g 30 g 15 g
Rice (not-cooked) 190 g 140 g 125 g 95 g 65 g 48 g 24 g
Macaroni (uncooked) 140 g 100 g 90 g 70 g 45 g 35 g 17 g
Couscous (uncooked) 180 g 135 g 120 g 90 g 60 g 45 g 22 g
Quick oatmeal (uncooked) 90 g 65 g 60 g 45 g 30 g 22 g 11 g
Table salt 300 g 230 g 200 g 150 g 100 g 75 g 40 g
Butter / Margarine 240 g 180 g 160 g 120 g 80 g 60 g 30 g
Shortening 190 g 140 g 125 g 95 g 65 g 48 g 24 g
Fruits and légumes chopped 150 g 110 g 100 g 75 g 50 g 40 g 20 g
chopped walnuts 150 g 110 g 100 g 75 g 50 g 40 g 20 g
Nuts /ground almonds 120 g 90 g 80 g 60 g 40 g 30 g 15 g
Fresh bread crumbs (not packed) 60 g 45 g 40 g 30 g 20 g 15 g 8 g
Dry bread crumbs 150 g 110 g 100 g 75 g 50 g 40 g 20 g
Parmesan grated 90 g 65 g 60 g 45 g 30 g 22 g 11 g
Chocolate chips 150 g 110 g 100 g 75 g 50 g 38 g  19 g
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As the sun rises or sets in Colombia

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3 Recipes

2 Main dishes